Friday, June 7, 2013

A Garden of Artists

People from a planet without flowers would think we must be mad with joy the whole time to have such things about us.
~Iris Murdoch


Welcome! The Poetry Friday round-up is here this week.


I've talked about postage stamps in honor of poets, poetry and movies, and other poetic intersections. Today we have flowers named for poets, writers, fictional characters, artists, and composers:

Narcissus Barrett Browning, photo by Jeff Hart

Roses named for writers are called: Agatha Christie, Alexandre Dumas, Astrid Lindgren, Charles Dickens, Chaucer, Cyrano (I don't actually know whether this rose is named for the real person or the fictional version -- probably the fictional one), Grimm, Guy de Maupassant, Hans Christian Andersen, Honoré de Balzac, Mark Twain, Victor Hugo, and William Shakespeare (two).


Chaucer Rose, photo by T. Kiya

Flowers named for characters or works (all roses except for the Don Quixote tulip): Madame Bovary, Peer Gynt, Prospero, Don Quichotte, Tess of the d'Urbervilles


Ophelia Rose, photo by Laitche

Roses named for artists include: the Albrecht Dürer rose, Auguste Renoir, Botticelli, Camille Pissarro, Charles Rennie Mackintosh, Edgar Degas, Henri Matisse, Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Paul Cézanne, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Rembrandt, Rodin, Rubens, Titian, and Toulouse Lautrec.

Roses named for musicians and composers: Édith Piaf (two roses), Freddie Mercury, Frederyk Chopin, Händel, Jacqueline du Pré, James Galway, Johann Strauß, Mozart, Paganini, Puccini, Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky, Ravel, Richard Wagner, Tchaikovski, and Verdi (two roses).

There are also flowers named for two of my favorite non-artists: Jeanne d'Arc (two-- a rose and a crocus) and Professor Einstein (rose).

A link to a poem about flowers: Astigmatism by Amy Lowell, "To Ezra Pound: with Much Friendship and Admiration and Some Differences of Opinion."

Leave a link in the comments and I will round them up!

* At Life on the Deckle Edge, Robyn has a poem by Margarita Engle from HURRICANE DANCERS.

* At The Poem Farm, Amy shares a poem about the weather in her heart...

* At TeacherDance, Linda is thinking about summer reading -- poetry!

* At Father Goose, Charles is pondering What Flies?

* Liz offers an original poem, "The First Day of Summer."

* Mary Lee has a poem for the day after the last day of school.

* It's also time to fill the July-Dec Poetry Friday Roundup Host calendar.

* At NC Teacher Stuff, Jeff shares an original poem about the last day of school.

* Laura Purdie Salas is in with a J. Patrick Lewis poem.

* At Author Amok, Laura Shovan celebrates poetry with Northfield ES third graders.

* Tara's contribution today is a poem to celebrate baseball (and the Red Sox).

* At Today's Little Ditty, Michelle has a video by Ingrid Michaelson to tickle your fancy.

* Jama is featuring What's in the Garden? and announcing the winner of the Wordsworth! Stop the Bulldozer! giveaway.

* At Random Noodling, Diane offers a post about beer.

* Kurious Kitty spotlights a poem by Lucille Clifton.

* KK's Kwotes has an old chestnut from Emily Dickinson.

* Margaret shares a guest poet today, Sandra Sarr, who wrote a Terza Rima in the style of Natasha Trethewey.

* At Radio, Rhythm & Rhyme, Matt is thinking about tending his lawn.

* At Poetry for Children, Sylvia highlights sharing poetry on a recent school visit in Bali.

* Catherine shares "Ox Cart Man" by Donald Hall.

* At Live Your Poem, Irene has Five for Poetry Friday.

* Iza's offering is "The Bee Boy's Song" by Rudyard Kipling.

* Anastasia shares an original poem, "Friday Love."

* At There is no such thing as a God-forsaken town, Ruth has "Dropping Keys" by Hafiz.

* Dori focuses on crossing genres, with French horns and fairy tales, along with some poetry.

* Violet's post is an original poem written for David Harrison's word-of-month prompt 'harrumph.'

* At Gathering Books, Fats shares a poem by Li-Young Lee about the sound of apples falling to the ground.

* Donna has 4 original wondery poems for kids at heart.

* Lorie Ann offers Blue Branches, a haiku, at On Point.

* Ms Mac contributes an original tritina.

* Keri is in today with an original poem about volunteer plants in the garden.

* At Tapestry of Words, Becky shares a poem about endings.

* Betsy at I Think in Poems brings us "Burned," an original poem.

* At Musings, Joyce Ray is thinking of graduates as she shares Earth Your Dancing Place by May Swenson.

* Janet tells us about "Whisper and Shout: Poems to Memorize" edited by Patrice Vecchione.

35 comments:

Robyn Hood Black said...

Oh, Tabatha, there should be a flower named for YOU! You pick the color....
Thanks for hosting today.

I have a poem by the amazing Margarita Engle, from HURRICANE DANCERS.
http://www.robynhoodblack.com/blog.htm?post=913727

Amy Ludwig VanDerwater said...

Tabatha, You always share the most fascinating things, all wrapped in beauty. This is perfect for my family today, as our children's school will have their last day of school Rose Ceremony today. Thank you so much for hosting with roses!

Over at The Poem Farm, I have a poem about the weather in my heart... http://www.poemfarm.amylv.com/2013/06/waving-hands-what-is-weather-in-your.html

Linda at teacherdance said...

The rose names are wonderful. I know so little about them, just a few names really. Thanks for doing the research, Tabatha! But that poem. Doesn't it make you wonder about that relationship, or was there one? Is Lowell just blasting away, although the title doesn't make that so. It's rather a lonely poem, isn't it? Thanks for that, & for hosting! I have a poetry anthology 'summer read' to recommend this time!

Charles Ghigna said...

Thanks, Tabatha! Love your garden!

Birds and bees and butterflies are taking flight today over at the FATHER GOOSE Blog

Charles Ghigna said...

Thanks, Tabatha! Love your garden! We have birds and bees and butterflies flying around today over at the FATHER GOOSE Blog

Liz Steinglass said...

Tabatha,

Thanks for your post and for hosting Poetry Friday.
Yesterday was the last day of school for two of my kids so today I have an original poem, "The First Day of Summer."

http://elizabethsteinglass.com/2013/06/the-first-day-of-summer/

Mary Lee said...

I swear I can smell the roses in this post! Gorgeous!! Thanks for hosting!

I have a poem for the day after the last day of school:

http://readingyear.blogspot.com/2013/06/poetry-friday-day-after-last-day-of.html

It's also time to fill the July-Dec Poetry Friday Roundup Host calendar:

http://readingyear.blogspot.com/2013/06/poetry-friday-call-for-roundup-hosts.html

Jeff Barger said...

It's appropriate that Shakespeare would have a rose. In Romeo and Juliet, he wrote "A rose by any other name would smell as sweet." I really enjoyed reading your post today. At NC Teacher Stuff, I have an original poem about the last day of school:

http://ncteacherstuff.blogspot.com/2013/06/poetry-friday-goodbye-bears.html

laurasalas said...

Ahhh...beautiful flower pictures. How cool--all the ways we honor those who inspire us.

I'm in with a J. Patrick Lewis poem today at http://laurasalas.wordpress.com/2013/06/06/pf-blue-whales/

Thanks for hosting, Tabatha!

Author Amok said...

Good morning, Tabatha! What lovely flowers... I have a vase of peonies, coral bells and pink roses up at Author Amok today. They were a gift from my Northfield ES third graders, who held a poetry celebration this week.

Photos of the event and three students' portrait poems are up on my blog today. http://authoramok.blogspot.com/2013/06/scenes-from-open-house.html

Tara @ A Teaching Life said...

Oh, I do love stopping by here and learning something new, Tabatha! Funny how some of these names sound rose-y and some do not (Freddy Mercury???!!!). Anyway, here's my contribution today - a poem to celebrate baseball (and the Red Sox):
http://tmsteach.blogspot.com/2013/06/poetry-friday-poetry-and-red-sox.html

Michelle Heidenrich Barnes said...

I can't imagine a nicer way to have my creativity honored. I especially love that there's a Freddie Mercury rose!

And speaking of inspiring musicians... On Today's Little Ditty, I have a wonderful video by Ingrid Michaelson to tickle your fancy: http://michellehbarnes.blogspot.com/

jama said...

What a beautiful poetry garden to end the week! You do find the best and most unique stuff! Somewhere there must be a Tabatha Rose. :)

Today I'm featuring What's in the Garden? and announcing the winner of the Wordsworth! Stop the Bulldozer! giveaway:

http://jamarattigan.com/2013/06/07/friday-feast-whats-in-the-garden-by-marianne-berkes-and-cris-arbo/

Thanks so much for hosting!

Diane Mayr said...

The only thing better than flowers is...I guess there's nothing better than flowers! Great post, Tabatha!

At Random Noodling I have a post about...wait for it...BEER!
http://randomnoodling.blogspot.com/2013/06/poetry-friday-hicu-you-must-be-21-or.html

Kurious Kitty has a fun poem by Lucille Clifton. http://kuriouskitty.blogspot.com/2013/06/poetry-friday-note-passed-to-superman.html

And KK's Kwotes has an old chestnut from Emily Dickingson. http://www.kkskwotes.blogspot.com/2013/06/poetry-friday.html

reflectionsontheteche said...

Thanks for all the flowers and for hosting. I have a guest poet today, Sandra Sarr, who wrote a Terza Rima in the style of Natasha Trethewey. http://reflectionsontheteche.wordpress.com/2013/06/07/matinal-oceania/

Matt Forrest Esenwine said...

Wow, you learn something new everyday! I had no idea so many people had roses named after them. (Freddy Mercury, really??)

Today I'm doing a little gardening of my own. And mowing. Lots of mowing. http://mattforrest.wordpress.com/2013/06/07/poetry-friday-growing-greens/

Sylvia Vardell said...

Hi, Tabatha, and thank you for hosting. What fun to explore flowers named after writers! My post today highlights my recent visit to a school in Bali and sharing poetry with the kids.

http://poetryforchildren.blogspot.com/

Catherine said...

This is a lovely post, Tabatha. I'm looking forward to the weekend when I'll have time to come back and read all the poems others have shared today.

Today, I've shared "Ox Cart Man" by Donald Hall at http://readingtothecore.wordpress.com/2013/06/07/poetry-friday-ox-cart-man/

Thanks for hosting!
Catherine

Irene Latham said...

Thank you, Tabatha, for making me feel all rosy this morning! And I'm with Jama... show me that Tabatha Rose. :) I'm in with a hodgepodge Five for Poetry Friday. Thank you for hosting! xo

iza said...

How interesting! I love learning this. Thanks! And, yes, Tabatha Rose rolls nicely off the tongue :-)

My offering today is "The Bee Boy's Song" by Rudyard kipling http://izatrapani.com/wp/?p=2317

Anastasia Suen said...

Thanks for hosting today. TGIF! I wrote a new poem: Friday Love.

http://www.asuen.com/poetry/friday-love/

Ruth said...

What a great post! Thank you for hosting. I am sharing a poem today that I got from you, back at the beginning of May, and can't stop thinking about. http://thereisnosuchthingasagodforsakentown.blogspot.com/2013/06/poetry-friday-dropping-keys.html

Doraine Bennett said...

Don't you wonder what exactly it was about that rose that made the gardener chose those wonderful folks we love for names?

My post focuses on crossing genres. No gardeners in the mix, but French horns and fairy tales, along with some poetry.

http://dorireads.blogspot.com/2013/06/to-move-to-breathe-to-fly-to-float-to.html

Violet N. said...

What an interest post, Tabatha. Count on you to come up with such a novel take on poetry!

My offering today is an original poem written for David Harrison's word-of-month prompt 'harrumph.'

Circus Scandal is here:
http://vnesdolypoems.wordpress.com/2013/06/06/circus-scandal/

Fats Suela from Gathering Books said...

Hi Tabatha!

Thank you for hosting!! Naming flowers after poets, writers, fictional characters, artists, and composers is so cool. When my boyfriend got me orchids last Valentine's Day, I named it "Darcy" after Mr. Darcy from Pride and Prejudice. I really don't know why I decided on naming it as such. It was the first name that came to mind. So, yes, I do have a Darcy Moth Orchid.

As for my Poetry Friday offering, I am sharing a poem by Li-Young Lee about the sound of apples falling to the ground. What's interesting is that this poem was taken from his collection "Rose." I guess you can say it's Floral (Poetry) Friday!! Thanks again Tabatha!! =)

- Fats

Donna Smith said...

Mmmm. And my post has a rose in it! 4 original wondery poems for kids at heart here at Mainely Write http://mainelywrite.blogspot.com/2013/06/i-wonder.html

Lorie Ann Grover said...

Such a lovely post on roses and their names. Thank you!

At On Point I have today's haiku, Blue Branches.

maclibrary said...

What lovely flowers. Thank you for hosting Poetry Friday. I have an original tritina: http://maclibrary.wordpress.com/2013/06/07/poetry-friday-summer-fun/

Keri said...

Your lovely post reminds me of the classic movie, "Mrs. Miniver," and the competition for the best rose. What a beautiful way to pay tribute to those who inspire us!

I'm in today with an original poem about volunteer plants in the garden at http://kerirecommends.com/2013/06/07/poetry-friday--a-tribute-to-my-volunteer-plants.aspx.

Happy Friday!
Keri Collins Lewis

Becky said...

Tabatha, I LOVE your post today! Thank you for sharing such a beautiful wealth of information with us--I had no idea there are roses named for authors!

My Poetry Friday post today is about Endings: www.beckyshillington.blogspot.com

Thanks so much!

Joyce Ray said...

Tabatha, I'm late to the party at Musings with a May Swenson poem perfect for graduates, "Earth Your Dancing Place." www.joyceray.blogspot.com

Janet S. said...

Thanks for hosting.
My selection is "Whisper and shout: poems to memorize" edited by Patrice Vecchione.

Janet S. said...

Thanks for hosting.
My selection is "Whisper and shout: poems to memorize" edited by Patrice Vecchione.

catherinemjohnson.wordpress.com said...

What a lovely post about roses, Tabatha. And that poem is super!

Joyce Ray said...

Tabatha, I loved walking through your rose garden. Lowell's poem is intriguing. I suppose the Poet is Ezra Pound and Lowell is the one with the "Brother" phrase. I don't know much about Pound. Did Lowell think he had a narrow opinion of what made a perfect poem - thus his comparison of beautiful flowers to his idea of the best, the rose? Thanks for sharing a poem that calls us to appreciate the beauty around us.